Women in Nazi society

by Jill Stephenson

Publisher: Croom Helm in London

Written in English
Published: Pages: 223 Downloads: 832
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Places:

  • Germany

Subjects:

  • Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiter-Partei.,
  • Women -- Germany -- Social conditions.,
  • Germany -- Politics and government -- 1933-1945.

Edition Notes

StatementJill Stephenson.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHQ1623 .S73 1975b
The Physical Object
Pagination223 p. ;
Number of Pages223
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL4936504M
ISBN 10085664235X
LC Control Number76363606

Nazi women, far fewer in number than their male counterparts in the Third Reich, still played a critical role in the lead-up to and beginning of the Second World War. After all, Adolf Hitler had very clear ideas about the role of women in the Third Reich. Women were to be the homemakers of society, cooking, cleaning, keeping house and making. role of household wife/mother women should play in society. To further the explanation on how the Nazi leaders viewed the issue of women in the state, Claudia Koonz, in her book Mothers in the Fatherland, includes an excerpt by Goebbels, the propaganda minister when he stated, “We have replaced individuality with collective racialFile Size: KB. Nazi Germany is a reference for the twelve-year period in German history () during the totalitarian dictatorship of Adolf Hitler through the Nazi Party, which was founded in as the German Workers’ Party. The group grew in retaliation to the terms of the Treaty of Versailles and promoted German pride and anti-Semitism, two traits that infused Nazi Germany. Women in Modern Germany is a book for people interested in German History. The book describes traditional and non - traditional roles Nazi set forth for 'Arayan' women. In addition it describes how the Nazi's regime aimed to control the 'Aryan' women by /5(3).

  Historians of the Nazi period—Daniel Goldhagen and Claudia Koonz, among others—used “Account Rendered” as a primary source. Women’s studies researchers tried to discover in it the. A poster advertising an exhibition on the role of women in German society that was being held as the Nazis put an end to Weimar democracy in the spring of Translation: Woman, An Exhibition of Women's Life and influence on family, home and work Berlin, , 18 March - 23 April at The Funkturm (Berlin's "Eiffel Tower" built in ). women in Nazi society, scholars Adelheid von Saldern and Mary Nolan questioned the efficacy of the Opfer-Täterin debate. They urged historians to abandon attempts to construct a ―homogenized gender history‖ and accept the multiplicity of women‘s experiences in the Third Reich as an historical reality. The second. Creating the New Soviet Woman: Women’s Magazines as Engineers of Female Identity, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, In the aftermath of the Revolution, Bolsheviks were committed to creating a new type of person that would be willing to be subordinate to the interests of the rest of society.

  This is only one of the many apparent contradictions addressed in Dr. Koonz's new book, ''Mothers in the Fatherland: Women, the Family and Nazi .   Women with official roles in Hitler’s Reich—such as Gertrud Scholtz-Klink, the top woman in the Nazi Party—may have been highly visible, but they were largely figureheads, wielding little political power in the formal sense. The contribution of other women in numerous other roles has, in contrast, gone largely unacknowledged and : HMH Books.

Women in Nazi society by Jill Stephenson Download PDF EPUB FB2

This fascinating book examines the position of women under the Nazis. The National Socialist movement was essentially male-dominated, with a fixed conception of the role women should play in society; while man was the warrior and breadwinner, woman was to be the Women in Nazi society book and : Hardcover.

Book Description This fascinating book examines the position of women under the Nazis. The National Socialist movement was essentially male-dominated, with a fixed conception of the role women should play in society; while man was the warrior and breadwinner, woman was to be the homemaker and childbearer.

This fascinating book examines the position of women under the Nazis. The National Socialist movement was essentially male-dominated, with a fixed conception of the role women should play in society; while man was the warrior and breadwinner, woman was to be the homemaker and childbearer/5. Overview: This fascinating book examines the position of women under the Nazis.

The National Socialist movement was essentially male-dominated, with a fixed conception of the role women should play in society; while man was the warrior and breadwinner, woman was to be the homemaker and childbearer.

This fascinating book examines the position of women under the Nazis. The National Socialist movement was essentially male-dominated, with a fixed conception of the role women should play in society; while man was the warrior and breadwinner, woman was to be the homemaker and by:   This fascinating book examines the position of women under the Nazis.

The National Socialist movement was essentially male-dominated, with a fixed conception of the role women should play in society; while man was the warrior and breadwinner, woman was to be the homemaker and childbearer/5(3).

DOI link for Women in Nazi Society. Women in Nazi Society book. By Jill Stephenson. Edition 1st Edition.

First Published eBook Published 5 March Women in Nazi society book. location London. Early inthe NSLB, the professional organisation in which women were best represented, appointed women ‘advisers’ for the areas in which women were Author: Jill Stephenson.

Women in Nazi Germany. Jill Stephenson. Longman, - History - pages. 1 Review. From images of jubilant mothers offering the Nazi salute, to Eva Braun and Magda Goebbels, women in Hitler¿s 4/5(1).

Men 8, historians studying women were trying to figure out the extent to which women were culpable in the Nazi atrocities.

Claudia Koonz’s book Mothers in the Fatherland: Women, the Family, and Nazi Politics, is one piece that is cited by most historians of women in Nazi Germany since its publication.9 Her book published in the s is reallyAuthor: Karin Lynn Brashler.

Jill Stephenson’s main argument in her book circles around the Nazi regime’s ideology about women and their goals to control and perpetuate the Aryan race through women by blurring the lines between the public and private spheres of life. Stephenson comments on the highly patriarchal state of German society (3).

This fascinating book examines the position of women under the Nazis. The National Socialist movement was essentially male-dominated, with a fixed conception of the role women should play in society; while man was the warrior and breadwinner, woman was Author: Jill Stephenson.

Try the new Google Books. Check out the new look and enjoy easier access to your favorite features Women in Nazi Society, Volume 35 Jill Labour Service large number leadership Lebensborn Lida Gustava Heymann March marriage married women National Socialist Nazi aim Nazi Party Nazi view Nazi women's organisation Nazis claimed November.

The lives of women in Nazi Germany were shaped by policies and attitudes emanating from the National Socialist (NSDAP) government.

These policies were, to a large extent, shaped by the personal views of Adolf Hitler. Hitler had traditionalist ideas of gender. They were probably influenced by his mother. This fascinating book examines the position of women under the Nazis. The National Socialist movement was essentially male-dominated, with a fixed conception of the role women should play in society; while man was the warrior and breadwinner, woman was to be the homemaker and : Taylor And Francis.

Women in Nazi society. London: Croom Helm, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Jill Stephenson. Synopsis From images of jubilant mothers offering the Nazi salute, to Eva Braun and Magda Goebbels, women in Hitler's Germany and their role as supporters and guarantors of the Third Reich continue to exert a particular fascination.4/5(7).

Controversy followed the publication of footage of a young queen giving a Nazi salute. But in those days, British high society’s worship of Hitler was in full bloom. Women in Nazi Germany were to have a very specific role. Hitler was very clear about this.

This role was that they should be good mothers bringing up children at home while their husbands worked. Outside of certain specialist fields, Hitler saw no reason why a woman should work. Education taught girls from the earliest of years that this was the lifestyle they.

Women in Nazi society by Jill Stephenson Published in New :   The book ends with a quote from Israeli psychologist Dan Bar-On: “Violent conflicts create zones of silence in a society. The deeds and responsibility of. Lebensborn e.V. (literally: "Fount of Life") was an SS-initiated, state-supported, registered association in Nazi Germany with the goal of raising the birth rate of Aryan children of persons classified as 'racially pure' and 'healthy' based on Nazi racial hygiene and health born provided welfare to its mostly unmarried mothers, encouraged anonymous births by unmarried women Headquarters: Munich, Germany.

Nazis. They were the “superior” women who fitted in with the Nazi notion of an Aryan woman. I intend no offence by leaving out those German women who were persecuted by the Nazis, such as German Jewish women, Communists and trade unionists, gypsies and 2 See Carol Gilligan, Different Moral Size: KB.

Even taking into account all these changes, Germany remained a patriarchal society both at home and in the workplace. However, since the mids offices have been created to help advance equal rights for women, both in West Germany and in the unified Germany.

After unification women, especially from Eastern Germany, suffered the most. Education - Education - Nazi Germany: After Adolf Hitler’s accession to power inthe Nazis set out to reconstruct German society. To do that, the totalitarian government attempted to exert complete control over the populace.

Every institution was infused with National Socialist ideology and infiltrated by Nazi personnel in chief positions. Women in Nazi Germany book. Read 3 reviews from the world's largest community for readers.

From images of jubilant mothers offering the Nazi salute, to E /5. None of the recent work on women in Nazi Germany considers Nazi ideology on women in any detail. Jill Stephenson, in Women in Nazi Society (New York: Barnes & Noble, ), examines Nazi policy toward women in the period but does not consider Nazi ideology.

(See my review of Stephenson's book in the Journal of Social History   This fascinating book examines the position of women under the Nazis. The National Socialist movement was essentially male-dominated, with a fixed conception of the role women should play in society; while man was the warrior and breadwinner, woman was to be the homemaker and : Jill Stephenson.

Books; Women in Nazi Society; Women in Nazi Society. Titel: Women in Nazi Society Schrijver: Stephenson, J. Plaats van uitgifte: Londen Jaar van uitgifte: Related to. Women in Nazi ideology and the Nazi economy.

Looking for reliable information or news facts about WW2. Do you want to create your own battlefield tour to sights of wars from. I believe that Women in Nazi Germany provides a lot more back up and evidence for Stephenson's many claims concerning women's organizations and their roles in Nazi society.

Jill Stephenson's later book, with keeping these reviews in mind, addresses more broadly and succinctly issues such as the influence of the economic downturn, women's roles.

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War. Leila Rupp; Women in Nazi Society. By Jill Stephenson (New York: Barnes and Noble, viii + pp. $), Journal of Social History, Vol Issue 3,Author: Leila Rupp.The market on wholesale cruelty towards the inhabitants of German concentration camps was not, it is safe to say, monopolized by men. In fact, during the course of the war around 5, females served in various guard positions in German camps.

Below is a list of those who “attacked” their job and their charges with a ferocity which was.Mothers of the Nation: The Ambiguous Role of Nazi Women in Third Reich Abstract The Nazi Party made it clear from the beginning, that its vision of society called for women to focus more on the bearing and raising of children than on the notion of individual development, including working outside of the household or engaging in political Author: Samantha Schuring.